Monthly Archives: May 2013

Career Opportunity: Quality Assurance Lab Technician with Huber Engineered Woods

huber
Learn more about this family owned company that offers a fantastic opportunity to grow in your career!

Product Quality Testing
• Conducts physical and mechanical property tests on finished and in-process products according to a prescribed schedule, the Quality Management System, and work instructions to assure compliance and control to all HEW quality standards and process and product specifications.
• Assures integrity of all results. Enters all results into spreadsheet, database, and SPC program and tracks key parameters with statistical charts.
• Presents product/process variations to the leadership team. Continue reading

Free lab glue spreader

Olympic Panel has a 22 inch spreader in very good condition. It’s free except the cost of shipping for a university or non-profit in the USA. The contact information is listed below:

Ken Pratt
Technical Sales Manager
Olympic Panel Products LLC
Shelton, WA
360-432-5005 Office
360-791-9408 Cell
kpratt@olypanel.com

Renewable Natural Resource Foundation (RNRF) Hosts Congressional Forum on Federal Budget Sequestration, May 16, 2013

RNRF
SWST members, Howard Rosen and World Nieh, attended a Congressional Forum hosted by RNRF on Sustaining Natural Resources and Conservation Science: What is at Stake in the Years Ahead, in the Capitol Building on May 16, 2013. The forum followed RNRF’s December 2012 National Congress of the same name which was previously reported in the SWST Newsletter. Rosen, as chair of the RNRF Board, opened the forum with an overview of current funding challenges at federal science and natural resources management agencies. Following his remarks, those in attendance discussed the effects of diminished funding on these agencies, as well as the long-term impacts that will result from today’s reduced monetary and program capacity. Continue reading

Tenure Track position in Bio-Based Materials

The Department of Forest Products Technology is the leading unit in higher education in the forest products technologies in Europe and globally, with an average of 50 M.Sc. and 10 D.Sc. degrees annually. In addition to an extensive international exchange of students, research scientists and lecturers, many research projects collaborate with research groups abroad. Our goal is to be a leading, globally networked and renowned centre of excellence in the field of forest products education and research. For more information about the department, see http://puu.aalto.fi/en/. Continue reading

Tenure Track position in Wood Material Science and Technology

The Department of Forest Products Technology is the leading unit in higher education in the forest products technologies in Europe and globally, with an average of 50 M.Sc. and 10 D.Sc. degrees annually. In addition to an extensive international exchange of students, research scientists and lecturers, many research projects collaborate with research groups abroad. Our goal is to be a leading, globally networked and renowned centre of excellence in the field of forest products education and research. For more information about the department, see http://puu.aalto.fi/en/.

The successful candidate is expected to conduct teaching and research that strengthens and complements the existing efforts at the Department of Forest Products Technology. The appointment may be at any level from Assistant Professor to Tenured Full Professor. Especially young candidates with high potential are encouraged to apply. For more information: Click Here

Creating Better Forestry Certification Programs through Competition

By: Donald Rieck and Wayne Winegarden
may8-9253
It is basic Economics 101. Competitive markets create better outcomes than monopolists. Monopolists restrict supply and charge higher prices. Dynamically, monopolists face fewer incentives to create new products or improve how their products are made. In fact, creating new technologies or processes could undermine a monopolist’s current market dominance.

What is true for the marketplace is also true for the regulations governing the actions of the marketplace. An interesting example of this principle is afforded by a current controversy over forestry certification programs.

While consuming timber products requires the harvesting of trees, many consumers, if not the vast majority, value forests and want their timber products harvested responsibly – in a way that sustain our forests.

A sustainable forest is broadly understood as one that conserves biodiversity, protects endangered species, is vibrant, is capable of regenerating, and is managed responsibly. Maintaining a sustainable forest also ensures that the economic needs of the timber industry and its consumers are also fulfilled.

Sound forestry management must balance out all of these competing needs that may, and often do, conflict.

It is extremely difficult, if not impossible, for consumers to know whether the timber was harvested responsibly by examining the final product. Forest certification programs encourage both private and public landowners to manage their forests responsibly and communicate this information to consumers and businesses empowering them to purchase wood products knowing that the timber has been harvested in a responsible manner.

Due to the multiple and competing needs, multiple certification programs have arisen. Each program balances the conflicting needs in timber production differently. Many environmental groups accuse one standard (the SFI standard) of weighing economic needs too heavily. Many forest landowners, however, find another standard (the FSC standard) to be impractical, due to the many differing standards – more than 30 worldwide – and the economic costs created by strict application of this programs’ approach in the United States.

As reflected in an April 22 Huffington Post article, environmental groups preach that the FSC standard should be the only regulatory standard – advocating that a single overall regulatory structure should replace the current competitive landscape. The FSC standard does not have any special insights regarding how to balance the many competing needs though. And, should the FSC’s standards not correctly balance all of these competing needs, adverse consequences will result.

The FSC standard weighs economic considerations lightly, and consequently creates significantly higher costs for those landowners that adhere to its principles in the United States. The higher costs of producing under the FSC standard are, ultimately, priced into the costs of the products.

More problematic, the price premiums associated with FSC-certified wood do not necessarily correspond with an environmentally-friendly product because FSC’s standards vary throughout the world. U.S. foresters end up facing high, costly benchmarks for certification, while their counterparts in Russia and China (among many other countries) can more easily obtain FSC recognition.

Back in the United States, if the costs created by the FSC standards exceed what consumers are willing or able to support, then requiring all domestic forests to adhere to the FSC standards will discourage people from purchasing timber from domestic forests. The consequences for the U.S. economy would be income and job losses. The adverse impacts would not be just economic, however.

U.S. policies that favor FSC wood create incentives to purchase timber from environmentally questionable regions and countries. The consequences from these purchases, though unintentional, are a reduction in the health of global forests and excessive global forest degradation compared to the more environmentally sustainable practices that consumers would support under more balanced U.S. forestry standards. Continue reading

Welcome to the new SWST Newsletter

Society of Wood Science & Technology

Welcome to both the new Society of Wood Science and Technology Newsletter and Blog. In the coming month we will be refining the way information and news is shared with you. As always, your news items, comments and suggestions are always welcome. Hope to see you in Austin for the annual meeting!

Cheers,

David Jones

Graduate Research Assistantship (M.Sc. or Ph.D.) in Wood Products Manufacturing

The Purdue University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Wood Research Laboratory (http://www.agriculture.purdue.edu/fnr/woodresearch/index.htm) is offering graduate research assistantship with an emphasis on Primary or Secondary Wood Products Manufacturing. The successful candidate will have an opportunity to work on state-of-the-art topic. Continue reading